anneboleyns:

YOU CAN’T HAVE MY HEART.

deutschemark:


1. Austrian Empire: Crown of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor2. German Empire: German State Crown3. Russian Empire: Great Imperial Crown4. Kingdom of Hungary: Holy Crown of Saint Stephen5. German Empire: Crown of the German Empress6. Kingdom of Bohemia: Crown of St. Wenceslas7. Kingdom of Prussia: Crown of Wilhelm II8. German Empire: Crown of the Crown Prince9. Kingdom of Bavaria: Royal crown of Bavaria10. United Kingdom: Crown of St. Edward11. United Kingdom: Crown of Queen Victoria12. Kingdom of Italy: Royal crown of Italy13. Archduchy of Austria: Archducal coronet14. Kingdom of Sweden: Crown of the Swedish Crown Prince15. Kingdom of Romania: Steel Crown of Romania

From Hugo Gerhard Ströhl’s Heraldic Atlas, 1899

deutschemark:

1. Austrian Empire: Crown of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor
2. German Empire: German State Crown
3. Russian Empire: Great Imperial Crown
4. Kingdom of Hungary: Holy Crown of Saint Stephen
5. German Empire: Crown of the German Empress
6. Kingdom of Bohemia: Crown of St. Wenceslas
7. Kingdom of Prussia: Crown of Wilhelm II
8. German Empire: Crown of the Crown Prince
9. Kingdom of Bavaria: Royal crown of Bavaria
10. United Kingdom: Crown of St. Edward
11. United Kingdom: Crown of Queen Victoria
12. Kingdom of Italy: Royal crown of Italy
13. Archduchy of Austria: Archducal coronet
14. Kingdom of Sweden: Crown of the Swedish Crown Prince
15. Kingdom of Romania: Steel Crown of Romania

From Hugo Gerhard Ströhl’s Heraldic Atlas, 1899


The Age of Innocence (1993)

Darling, all night
I have been flickering, off, on, off, on.

Sylvia Plath,Fever 103°.” from Ariel: The Restored Edition (via lifeinpoetry)

danielodowd:

soniaboller

b-classique:

"Featuring San Francisco Ballet principal dancers Maria Kochetkova and Joan Boada, "Francesca Da Rimini" is an experiment using a robotically controlled camera to capture ballet."

(Source: renlybaratheon)

Sometimes, in our confusion, we have been known to turn the Other into a monster and a god. Hierophanies – where the unshowable deity shows itself – are often terrifying. Hence the double etymology of monstrare, to show and to warn. Zeus’ mutations into a plundering bull or rapacious swan epitomize this paradox. And Kali certainly knew how to scare mortals. Even the generally ‘good’ biblical God could resort to horror on occasion, as Job realized; or Abraham when commanded to kill Isaac, or Jacob when he found himself maimed at the hip after wrestling with the dark angel of Israel. Or Zechariah struck dumb by the angel Gabriel. Not to mention the tales of floods and plagues and conflagrations sent by a jealous God to fill his people with fear. Divine monstrance was not infrequently an occasion of terror. Fascinans et tremendum, as the mystics said.

Poets too have attested to this enigma of the monstrous God. W.B. Yeats captured this disturbing ambiguity of the sacred, for example, in his apocalyptic image of the ‘rough beast slouching towards Bethlehem to be born’. A sentiment echoed by Rilke in his famous opening apostrophe to the Duino Elegies: ‘Every angel is terrible’. And one might also recall here Herman Melville’s chilling evocation of the quasi-divine, quasi-demonic whiteness of the whale, recalling at once the horror of Leviathan and the transcendence of Yahweh.

—Richard Kearney (Strangers, Gods and Monsters: Interpreting Otherness)

(Source: postcute)

(Source: pinterest.com)

fyeah-history:

Princess Anastasia (aged 15) smoking with her father, Tsar Nicholas II, 1916

fyeah-history:

Princess Anastasia (aged 15) smoking with her father, Tsar Nicholas II, 1916